First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.

Friday Night Banquet Keynote:  Dr. Peter Raven,

Director Emeritus - Missouri Botanical Gardens

Topic: "Saving Plants, Saving Ourselves"

  • Dr. Raven has been named "Hero for Our Planet" by TIME Magazine. He was awarded the U.S. National Medal of Science, and he served as Environmental Advisor to Pope Francis.

 

 

 

 

Friday Luncheon: Marji Morgan, Director of the Department of Communications - Central Washington University

Topic: “Sagebrush and Vineyards:

Washington’s Route to the World Wine Map”

  • During the past 40 years, Washington State has emerged as a premier wine region with more than 800 wineries.  Its high desert lands full of sagebrush and rattlesnakes have become world-class vineyards.  Using material from her Lines on Wines interviews with Washington winemakers, Marji Morgan will explore why Washington is unique as a wine region and how its wine industry has rapidly become a contender for international awards for a diverse array of fine wines.
  • Marji has long been a wine enthusiast, and her most recent teaching interest is in the area of food and drink history.

 

 

Session 1 - Thursday, September 21, 2017 1:45 - 3:15

 

1-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  Doug Rice: “Secrets of Garden Design”

Why do some homes have "street appeal" and others do not? Why are some gardens enchanting and others feel exposed and unsatisfying? The secret lies in the application of the laws of good design--and the use of environmental psychology. All land and air species and many aquatic animals too, from insects to bears, and including humans, are instinctively attracted to habitats that have helped them survive as a species. Is a house our natural habitat? Think again. They've only been around a couple thousand years. Instincts are built over millennia. Feng Shui, the Chinese art of proper placement was built on an early understanding of environmental psychology. Recent environmental studies have finally clarified what our human triggers are. This lecture will show in slides and discussion what the visual clues and secrets are for garden design that will feel deeply comforting, visually stimulating, and like a true "home" that virtually everyone will feel attracted to. The pictures will speak for themselves. Once you see it yourself, you will never see the world the same again.

 

Doug Rice is a landscape architect who has taught garden design in the Seattle Community College system for over 20 years. Doug studied under the renowned Rich Haag LA who studied under Jay Appleton, the inventor of environmental psychology related to the landscape. Doug has taught and applied these principles for nearly 30 years, with great success. He has also studied and taught "Form School" Feng Shui in past years.

 

1-B --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  Dr. Mike Bush, Panel: “Master Gardener Volunteers as First Detectors for Exotic Pests”

The annual economic impact of invasive species in the US is estimated at $133.6 billion. It is also estimated that there is a 32% risk that a wood-boring insect more damaging than the Emerald Ash Borer will be introduced into the US in the next 10 years.  In the US, Washington State is ranged the fourth-highest risk for exotic pest introductions.  Early detection of newly introduced pests is key for reducing impact and costs to Washington's agricultural and natural resources.  Master Gardeners play a role as First Detectors for WSU Extension by serving on the front-line in detecting many of these invasive species, as well as disseminating knowledge of those pests to local communities.

 

Panelists include:

Todd Murray (entomology), WSU Extension Unit Director, Pullman

Dave Pehling, (vertebrate pest mgmt..) WSU Extension-Snohomish Co

Sharon Collman, (entomology) WSU Extension-Snohomish Co

Dale Whaley, (entomology, biocontrol of invasive weeds) WSU Extension- Douglas County.

Mike Willett, manager of the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission

 

1-C --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Phyllis Pugnetti: “From Seed to Seed Library”

Four years ago Master Gardeners of Yakima started an Heirloom Vegetable Garden with the intention of creating a Seed Lending Library.  It was a long learning curve, filled with mistakes, failures, and finally successes.  Whether you’re new to seed saving, starting a backyard seed garden, or planning a new Master Gardener project, this presentation will let you take home many new ideas.

 

Phyllis Pugnetti  grew up in Pasco and Kennewick, moving to Issaquah, and finally settled in Yakima 13 years ago.  Her love affair with gardening started as a toddler playing in her grandma’s garden.  She had two very different gardening examples—her grandma who always gardened organically even when it was considered to be old fashioned, and her mom who believed that chemicals in the garden were the wave of the future.   By the 1970s organic gardening was once again ‘cool’ so Phyllis followed in her grandma’s footsteps.  Her interest is in organic gardening techniques; growing unusual and endangered vegetables; growing vegetables year round, saving open pollinated seed; and increasing pollinator habitat. She has been a MG since 2007.  She is the co-chair of MGs Heirloom Garden and Seed Library, editor for the last 6 years of the MG News (the monthly newsletter), and WA State MG of the Year in 2015.

 

1-D --- ENVIRONMENT ---  Sean Tait: "The Life of Trees"

This presentation is a survey of current research that has revealed some startling things about trees, indicating that they may be far more complicated than we ever imagined. Topics covered include tree communication, learning behavior, parenting strategies, and social relationships. Prepare to have your mind blown!

 

Born and raised in Selah, WA, Sean graduated from WWU with a degree in natural resource management, and has spent the last 17 years practicing as an arborist throughout Washington state. Sean has worked in all aspects of the green industry, from grunt laborer to product research and design. Sean currently practices arboriculture in Yakima for Arbor Life Tree Services, which focuses on tree restoration and preservation. Sean teaches tree related classes regularly at the Yakima Area Arboretum and on Lummi Island. Sean is also an avid climber and skier.

 

Session 2 - Thursday, September 21, 2017 3:30 - 5:00

 

2-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  Marianne Binetti: “Gardening in Dry Shade”

Love your trees and enjoy growing plants in the shade of their roots and other dry shade situations by putting to use these planting techniques and learning about the plants that do best in dry shade.  This will be a lively presentation with some unique ideas.

 

Marianne Binetti is a northwest horticultural expert: She has a degree in horticulture from Washington State University and writes a syndicated gardening column that runs in over a dozen newspapers each week including the The Tacoma News Tribune (Sundays) and The Daily Olympian (Saturdays). She has also written or co-written 10 gardening books including "Easy Answers for Great Gardens" and her latest book "Edible Gardening for Washington and Oregon" She lectures and gives seminars on a variety of topics. Marianne leads garden tours around the world with her husband Joe. She lives with her family in Enumclaw, near Seattle, Washington.

 

2-B --- FOOD  ---  Mike Willet: “GMO?Non-GMO, Organic / Conventional: What Does It all Mean? How Biotechnology and Organic Farming are Changing Production Horticulture”

 

Mike Willett has been the manager of the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission (WTFRC) since December 2015. The WTFRC is a grower-funded organization with a mission to fund research and industry service programs to benefit the tree fruit industry of Washington state.  For the previous two decades he was Vice President of Scientific Affairs for the Northwest Horticultural Council, a trade association representing the tree fruit industry of Idaho, Oregon and Washington on a broad range of federal and international policy and regulatory issues. In this capacity, he worked closely with the U.S. specialty crop industry, public and private research organizations, allied industries and regulatory agencies on a range of issues related to pest management, pesticide policy and phytosanitary concerns that affect domestic and international trade.  Before he started with the Northwest Horticultural Council, he was a tree fruit production and pest management regional specialist with both the Oregon and Washington State University Cooperative Extension (1980-1996).  He received a B.S. (1977) from Michigan State University and an M.S. (1981) and Ph.D. (1995) from Washington State University, all in horticulture.

 

2-C --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  Ken Bevis: “Backyard Wildlife Habitat: Dead Trees and Living Shrubs”

Wildlife require quality habitats in order to survive, or even thrive. Humans enjoy viewing wildlife as an element of quality of life, and can provide the elements necessary for wildlife to exist nearby. Humans, however, tend to simplify and "Clean up" the natural environment to attain socially accepted standards of aesthetics that often, if not usually, provide poor wildlife habitat. In this class, I will discuss alternatives to tidy landscapes that maintain and create natural habitat and provide for wildlife. These include many species of native shrubs and dead wood, particularly standing dead trees, also called snags. We can manage lands for better habitat quality by attending to key features. I will also describe the DNR's Forest Stewardship Program.

 

Ken Bevis is the Stewardship Biologist for the Washington Department of Natural Resource's (DNR) Small Forest Landowner office.  Ken is a lifelong hiker, hunter, fisherman, skier, bird watcher and avid naturalist. Originally from Virginia, he has lived in Washington since 1986, and has held a variety of positions in natural resource management including; the Forest Service, Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (15 years) and now, DNR.    Ken has a BS in Forestry and Wildlife from Virginia Tech (1979), and a Masters of Biology from Central Washington University (1994), where he studied Cavity Nesting Birds in three eastern Washington forest types.  He now helps landowners learn how to manage small private forest lands for wildlife on their property. He makes frequent presentations for workshops, classes and Washington State University Extension programs and is a talented singer/guitar player as well.  He continues to be fascinated with dead trees, and works daily on finding humor in everything.

 

2-D --- SOLD OUT!  GARDEN ARTS AND CRAFTS --- Robin Hawley & Renee Holwegner: “Botanical Print Making – Part One”

NOTE: Two-Part Class - Second session Friday #5-D;    $15 materials fee to be collected at class

 

Join sisters Robin Hawley and Renee Holwegner for a basic introduction and experimentation with botanical printing. Eco dyeing or botanical printing involves the use of foraged or grown natural plant material to imprint onto fabric. The result is a unique, all natural design with colors drawn directly from the plant matter. Each class participant will create one piece of wearable silk art for the price of $15.00. This cost is in addition to your general conference fee and covers all supplies needed for you to finish your project in the first session. The second session on day two reveals the results of your project and discusses plants best suited for growing in your garden landscape to make affordable and effective dyeing materials for you to continue your experimentation with this beautiful, renewable and sustainable art form. Space is limited.

 

An educator in Ashland School District for 15+ years, Robin Hawley was responsible for the design and implementation of two acres of family and student gardening at the campus of Willow Wind, a unique public school found on an old farmstead in Ashland, Oregon. Robin has long loved anything fiber, from sewing to weaving to dyeing, and began experimenting with botanical printing and eco-dyeing a few years ago with great outcomes. Her large home garden and daily forays hiking the hills around home provide much of the plant materials she'll share in her conference presentation.

 

Renee Holwegner has been a Master Gardener in Yakima County since 2012 and a past featured artist in the local publication of Yakima Magazine. Renee's home garden was displayed on the 2015 Yakima Area Arboretum garden tour. Renee is an active community volunteer and director of a local non-profit organization.  Renee is happiest when creating in her garden, kitchen or behind a welder's hood.

 

Session 3 - Friday, September 22, 2017 -  9:00 - 10:15

 

3-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  Marianne Binetti: “Winning the Weed Wars”

Don't upset Mother Nature when you wage battle on the weeds.  Learn the tips and techniques that control weeds before they sprout and how to deal with weed invasions without pulling out the poisons.  Learn about groundcovers, mulches, and weeding tools to win the war on weeds.

 

Marianne Binetti is a northwest horticultural expert: She has a degree in horticulture from Washington State University and writes a syndicated gardening column that runs in over a dozen newspapers each week including the The Tacoma News Tribune (Sundays) and The Daily Olympian (Saturdays). She has also written or co-written 10 gardening books including "Easy Answers for Great Gardens" and her latest book "Edible Gardening for Washington and Oregon" She lectures and gives seminars on a variety of topics. Marianne leads garden tours around the world with her husband Joe. She lives with her family in Enumclaw, near Seattle, Washington.

 

3-B --- FOOD  ---  Phyllis Pugnetti: “Gardening in Hard Times”

During the hard times in our lives, stress and anxiety levels increase.  Don’t let your garden be one more thing to add to your stress.  Learn the many ways your garden can reduce anxiety and stress, elevate mood, improve nutrition, and reduce food costs, enabling you to survive hard times with your health and sanity intact.

 

Phyllis grew up in Pasco and Kennewick, moving to Issaquah, and finally settled in Yakima 13 years ago.  Her love affair with gardening started as a toddler playing in her grandma’s garden.  She had two very different gardening examples—her grandma who always gardened organically even when it was considered to be old fashioned, and her mom who believed that chemicals in the garden were the wave of the future.   By the 1970s organic gardening was once again ‘cool’ so Phyllis followed in her grandma’s footsteps.  Her interest is in organic gardening techniques; growing unusual and endangered vegetables; growing vegetables year round, saving open pollinated seed; and increasing pollinator habitat. She has been a MG since 2007.  She is the co-chair of MGs Heirloom Garden and Seed Library, editor for the last 6 years of the MG News (the monthly newsletter), and WA State MG of the Year in 2015.

 

3-C --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  David James: "Biology and Conservation of the Monarch Butterfly in the Pacific Northwest”

Information on our rapidly evolving new understanding of Monarch butterfly biology and ecology in the Pacific Northwest will be presented.  In particular, the results of 5 years of citizen scientist-aided tagging of Monarchs will be discussed.  The importance of creating Monarch butterfly habitat in Washington gardens, parks and natural areas to help reverse population decline will also be discussed.

 

David G. James PhD, Associate Professor of Entomology, Washington State University, Prosser

David James developed a passion for entomology at the age of 8 in England by rearing caterpillars in his bedroom.

He studied Zoology at the University of Salford near Manchester, then migrated to Australia to work for the New South Wales Department of Agriculture on ways of controlling agricultural pests.

 

A PhD on the winter biology of Monarch butterflies in Sydney followed and a career as a biocontrol scientist in horticulture blossomed. David developed successful conservation biological control systems for stink bugs in citrus and for mites in pasture, grapes and peaches.

 In 1999 David became an Associate Professor at Washington State University at Prosser and worked on conservation biological control of insect and mite pests of hops and grapes.

David has published 180 peer-reviewed scientific papers and in 2011 he co-authored and published a widely-acclaimed book on the life histories of Pacific Northwest butterflies which renowned British naturalist David Attenborough called ‘Magisterial’.

Currently he is working on sustainability of IPM and conservation biological control in viticulture, insect and Monarch Butterfly conservation and community research and education projects.

 

3-D --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Nicole Martini: “Program / Foundation Relationship”

What are the ingredients for a harmonious Master Gardener Foundation and Program relationship? A hefty scoop of support, a whole lot of understanding of roles and responsibilities, and a large handful of sharing and focusing on desired outcomes. In this session you’ll learn from a panel of some stellar examples of programs and foundations working together using this formula, as well as an overview of the differences and similarities between local County MG Foundations and the WSU Extension MG Program. This is also an opportunity to hear from Kathleen Eaton (the MGFWS President) about the exciting new course of direction the Master Gardener Foundation of Washington State has charted for themselves in order to support the education of Master Gardeners across the state and provide much needed support to local County Foundations.

 

Nicole Martini began with WSU Extension as the Pierce County Master Gardener Program Coordinator. She now works with 3,700 volunteers and 35 faculty and staff to teach homeowners science-based, sustainable gardening practices that protect Washington’s natural resources. She was on the national eXtension Social Media Training Committee, is a co-lead for the WSU Extension Gardening Website and is leading the development of online trainings on tree stewardship funded by WA Department of Natural Resources.

 

Kathleen LaFrancis Eaton is a Pacific Northwest mystery writer. Her work encompasses academic to fiction including textbooks, essays, articles, short stories, blogs and newsletters. She has two mystery/thrillers in progress. As a dedicated Master Gardener, and President of the Master Gardener Foundation of Washington State she writes, teaches and raises funds for the state foundation. Her passion is to integrate her experience as a nurse, executive, and gardener into stories for readers that inspire personal growth and change. As a military brat, a nurse, and an international strategy professor, she travels widely. Her experiences challenge traditional norms. As a writer, she realizes that only a forensic nurse, or possibly a master gardener, could identify and solve the problems in her books.

 

SESSION 4 - Friday, September 22, 2017 - 10:30 - 11:30

 

4-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  George Lasch: “Growing Gorgeous Hydrangeas”

Join horticulturalist and hydrangea lover George Lasch for a tour of the many types of hydrangeas.  He will explain the distinguishing traits between species, how best to care for the different types, and how to keep  hydrangeas healthy and beautiful with proper pruning techniques.

 

George Lasch has been playing in the soil for his entire life.  After studying plant science in high school he spent 2 years at Longwood Gardens near Philadelphia learning how to do many things and followed that with a year in England training to be a gardener.  Having spent  a decade or so working his way across the continent with stops at an estate near Chicago and a stint in the research greenhouses at the Missouri Botanical Garden he has settled in the northwest..  After a long weekend visit to Seattle George found his home. For the past 18 years he has helped connect people and plants.

Working in many areas of horticulture has given him a broad base of experience.

A highlight being  guiding  the major renovation and regrowing of the large herbaceous border at the Bellevue Botanical Garden.

Lately he continues to teach horticulture for a local community college as well as   consulting, maintenance and design.He enjoys sharing his knowledge and opinions with others who are passionate about plants.

 

4-B --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  Bonnie Orr: “Everyone Wants to Compost: Teaching Them How”

This lively session includes handouts and hands-on learning about the why, when and how to compost effectively. It will include information for the participating master gardeners to help the public be happy composters.

 

Bonnie Orr took the Master Composter Course in Douglas County in 1994.  She has been a keen composter in her sandy yard, and has renewed her soil with dedicated and appropriate applications of compost. She has been a Master Gardener for 21 years. The focus of Bonnie’s garden is bird attraction and insect refuge.  She grows many fruity shrubs and over 100 varieties of flowers. Vegetable gardening is the inspiration for her monthly magazine column, “The Garden of Delights”, in the Good Life Magazine. She writes a monthly column for the Wenatchee World newspaper.  Bonnie has been a twice-weekly guest on KKRV radio for 18 years and stars in the weekly television show “Green Thumbs and Dirty Knees”.

 

 

4-C --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Cathi Lamoreux: “Adaptive Gardening For Life”

Intangible benefits of gardening continue as we age. Our interaction with the natural world, and the ability to get outside remain, and sometimes become even more important, as we continue to tend our gardens. Adapting our spaces, tools and techniques can keep us ahead of changing dynamics within our bodies and our gardens. Change is nature’s way of adapting and we need to be as attentive and smart about it as Mother Nature in order to keep doing what we love.

 

Cathi has lived in Spokane since 1992.  A native of the northwest, she lived in Montreal for 20 years and Maine for 3 years before returning to the west coast. Professionally, she is a Speech Language Pathologist with over 25 years of experience specializing in working with adults providing cognitive rehabilitation and swallowing therapy.  She also worked at WSU Spokane in the Area Health Education Center as the manager of Professional Education, developing and managing seminars and large conferences for healthcare providers.  She holds a BA in Early Childhood Education from Concordia University, Montreal, and a MA in Communication Disorders from the University of Maine.  She also has completed a certificate in Horticultural Therapy through the Legacy Health System in Portland, OR.  Cathi completed her Master Gardener training in 2008 and is an active member of the Spokane County Master Gardeners, and is a board member for the Master Gardener Foundation of Spokane County.

 

 

 

4-D --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Gini Obert: "From Open Field to Bountiful Harvest: The Story of the Buena Community Garden"

Use this presentation as a blueprint for establishing a Master Gardener-guided community garden in your own county.  Learn about building enthusiasm, as well as fostering community pride and involvement.  Gini will discuss the organizational steps that Yakima County Master Gardeners took to build a lasting garden infrastructure. Follow the season from first planting to a bountiful vegetable harvest.  This project received surprising contributions from the community, and whole families are being positively impacted through their involvement in the garden.  The tiny, rural town of Buena is experiencing new excitement and a revitalization of community spirit and pride.

 

Gini is a third generation, home grown, small town farm girl who lives to till the soil.  She graduated from Central Washington State College with a degree in recreation which prepared her to "go play in the sand box".  She helped build the Buena library, started an after-school tutoring program, and an adult English As a Second Language class. Her connection to agriculture included owning and operating a commercial apple packing warehouse and tree fruit farm.  After selling the family farm to retire, and still yearning to be involved in agriculture and her community, she started her own certified organic CSA  market garden, and became a Yakima County Master Gardener.  Her belief is that if each of us gives back as much as we use, our communities will thrive.

 

 

SESSION 5 - Friday, September 22, 2017 - 2:00 - 3:00

 

5-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  Carol Barany: “Flower Power: It’s All About Daaahlias, Daaaling”

Flower-Child (noun):  a young person, especially a hippie, rejecting conventional society and advocating love, peace, simple, idealistic values, and dahlias.

 

Flowers can't solve all the world's problems, but they're a great start.  We all know that fine foliage carries the garden, but don't you crave fresh, lavish floral bouquets?  Dahlias pack extraordinary flower power, and thrive on both sides of the Cascades.  Learn how to grow them to perfection.  Carol will have buckets of fresh-cut dahlias available, and each class participant can fashion their own bouquet to take home.

 

37 years ago, Carol Barany left Buffalo, NY in a blizzard, found paradise on 1.3 acres in urban Yakima, and learned how to garden.  A Yakima County Master Gardener since 2008, her column, 'In the Garden', is featured in the Yakima Herald-Republic, and she's a regular contributor to the Yakima Magazine. She was honored to receive the 2013 Master Gardener Foundation Media Award.

 

5-B --- FOOD  ---  Andrew McGuire: “Cover Crops for the Home Garden”

Cover crops add organic matter to your soils without having to haul it in! While growing, they protect the soil from wind and rain. When dead, they provide food for worms and microbes. Their roots provide channels in the soil for water and air. Cover crops help your soil build structure.  For all these reasons, more and more farmers are using cover crops. However, growing cover crops in the home garden is different than growing them on the farm. I will tell you what works best and how to take advantage of this valuable tool.

 

Working as an Irrigated Cropping Systems Agronomist for WSU Extension since 1999, Andrew McGuire helps farmers to implement sustainable solutions to irrigated farming challenges in the Columbia Basin of Washington. His current efforts focus on developing systems that build soils through high residue farming and cover cropping.

 

5-C --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Eric Larsen: “All Together, Not the Same”

How well do you know the stories of your fellow Master Gardeners?  Where are they from? What’s their family background? We each have different experiences, backgrounds, values and beliefs that make us who we are.  This great training is intended to help us grow closer as a Master Gardener community by celebrating our uniqueness through understanding our differences.  Learning objectives include:

  • Recognizing your own cultural lens and how that lens impacts your relationships with others.
  • Learning strategies and gaining tools and skills to implement when working across difference in the Master Gardener program.

This training will provide you the opportunity to integrate principles of belonging and inclusion practices that can be applied to the Master Gardener program that you serve. You’ll leave with a new perspective as well as resources, activities and lessons you can use with your local Master Gardeners, group, or any other context.

 

Eric Larsen is the Volunteer Development Specialist for Washington State University Extension.  Previously he served as a 4-H Youth Development Agent for the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension in Pima County.  Eric has an extensive background in youth camps, ranging from traditional overnight camps to specialized camps, which helped create his passion for youth development.  Throughout his involvement with the 4-H, FFA and Montana Farmers Union youth development organizations, he has seen and truly understands the importance of volunteers.   That is why Eric strives to make the volunteering experience rewarding and memorable for current and future volunteers within WSU Extension.

 

5-D --- GARDEN ARTS AND CRAFTS  ---  Robin Hawley & Renee Holwegner: “Botanical Print Making – Part Two”

 

NOTE: SOLD OUT! Two-Part Class - First session Thursday #2-D

 

 

 

SESSION 6 - Friday, September 22, 2017 - 3:15 - 4:45

 

6-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  George Lasch: “The Good, the Bad, and the Why Bother?”

Ever wonder what makes a plant "garden worthy"?  Why is it that some plants really are superior while others fail?  Come and take a critical and opinionated look at what we buy, plant, and edit in our gardens.  George will fearlessly lead us on a quest to decipher what attributes really matter when trying to choose the best plants.  His decades in public and private gardens have distilled a knack for seeing plants and gardens in a keen editorial light.  Every level and skill of gardener will be pushed to rethink the plants they choose or lose from their gardens.

 

George Lasch has been playing in the soil for his entire life.  After studying plant science in high school he spent 2 years at Longwood Gardens near Philadelphia learning how to do many things and followed that with a year in England training to be a gardener.  Having spent  a decade or so working his way across the continent with stops at an estate near Chicago and a stint in the research greenhouses at the Missouri Botanical Garden he has settled in the northwest..  After a long weekend visit to Seattle George found his home. For the past 18 years he has helped connect people and plants.

Working in many areas of horticulture has given him a broad base of experience.

A highlight being  guiding  the major renovation and regrowing of the large herbaceous border at the Bellevue Botanical Garden.

Lately he continues to teach horticulture for a local community college as well as   consulting, maintenance and design.He enjoys sharing his knowledge and opinions with others who are passionate about plants .

 

6-B --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  Tim Lawrence: “Decline of Honeybees and Exposure to Neonicitinoids”

This presentation will discuss the current body of knowledge on honey bee decline in the United States. In addition, I will also present the results of a comparative assessment of apiaries in urban, rural and agricultural landscapes. The study was undertaken from September of 2013 through the summer of 2014 to examine potential honey bee colony exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides from pollen foraging.  Apiaries ranged in size from one to hundreds of honey bee colonies, and included those operated by commercial, sideline (semi-commercial), and hobbyist beekeepers. This study specifically evaluated residues in/on wax and beebread (stored pollen in the hive) for the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and its olefin metabolite and the active ingredients clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran.

 

Dr. Tim Lawrence is an assistant professor and the Washington State University Extension director in Island County, Washington. He has his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in environmental sciences with a focus on human dimensions. He has more than 25 years of Extension experience in both community development, and agricultural and natural resources. Tim has been keeping bees for 54 years, he holds a bachelor’s degree in apiculture and pomology; a master’s of science in agricultural economics and rural sociology; and was a commercial beekeeper for more than 20 years. He has an adjunct appointment the WSU entomology department and is part of the WSU honey bee health program. He enjoys outdoor activities, meeting new people, and taking on new challenges.

 

6-C --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  Linda Chalker-Scott: “Garden Zombies: Horticultural Myths That Refuse to Die” 

No matter how much scientific evidence to the contrary, there are certain “garden miracles” that just won’t go away. Most concerning of these are the home remedies that encourage use of unregistered pesticides and untested fertilizers We’ll discuss why home remedies are so popular, consider the unforeseen consequences of using them, and then suggest evidence-based alternatives to use in your own gardens and landscapes. Handouts containing the text of the talk will be provided.

 

Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott has a PhD in horticulture from Oregon State University and is an ISA certified arborist, an ASCA consulting arborist, and an award-winning author. She is Washington State University's extension urban horticulturist and an also teaches at the University of Washington. Chalker-Scott has published extensively in the scientific literature and in popular magazines including American Nurseryman, Organic Gardening, and Fine Gardening. She also is one of the Garden Professors.

 

6-D --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Katie Howard: "The Science and Art of Writing Winning Grants"

Do grants feel like a magic source of money that you’ll never be able to access? The process of writing a winning proposal can feel like an uncertain, overwhelming, or confusing venture. The purpose of this workshop is to demystify the grant proposal process. We’ll review the proposal lifecycle, from research to submission, and discuss some of the mistakes people make when preparing their proposals and how to avoid them. We’ll also examine proposal excerpts from a grant reviewer’s perspective. This class is for people new to the grant writing arena, those who’ve struggled to win grants in the past, and people who feel timid about writing.

 

 

Katie Howard has worked in the nonprofit sector as a grant writing & fundraising professional and consultant since 2000. Throughout her career, she has helped public and private organizations raise more than $131 million to serve some of Washington State's most vulnerable populations. She founded KH Consulting in 2009 to equip professionals and organizations with the strategies, words, resources, and tools that help them work toward the greater good.

 

 

SESSION 7 - Saturday, September 23, 2017 - 9:00 - 10:15

 

7-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  Sean: “Benefits of Compost As a Soil Amendment”

Sean will discuss how Cedar Grove makes compost, and its benefits.  She will include a description of compost’s life cycle in the garden, and the need for adding compost back to the native soil.

 

Sean Alabaster, key account manager at Cedar Grove, previously managed the Covington Home Depot store for 11 years. He earned Specialty Sales Captain, Pro-Sales Captain and Most Improved Voice of the Customer awards with Home Depot. He was named Top Regional Manager for 2012.

 

Sean was the Formal School Director, Squadron Training Officer, and Officer in Charge of Navigation Department with the U.S. Marine Corps.

 

He earned his Associate of Arts in General Education from Maryland University Extension.

 

7-B --- FOOD  ---  Jeff Upton: “A New Way to Grow Fruit in the Backyard Garden”

The presentation will cover methods used to grow quality home garden fruit with suggestions on how to accomplish this with the least effort, best practices, and lowest ecological impact.  Master Gardeners in the Wenatchee Valley, Yakima Valley, Columbia Basin, or Spokane County, are cautioned against encouraging residents to plant apple trees in their backyards.  If they do plant apples and pears, and have difficulty managing pests, commercial growers could be affected.    This class will give all Master Gardeners information on how to help backyard gardeners grow healthy, home-grown tree fruit.

 

Jeff grew up in a farming family, and has a degree in biology as well as  over 25 years of experience in growing tree fruit. He has done research in tree fruit and row crops with USDA-ARS, and is currently a horticulturalist  with Yakima County Extension.

 

 

7-C --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Doug Rice, "Designing With Plants"

Many people design with plants by going to the nursery and buying what they see, on the spot.  There may be no relationship between this new purchase and what's already growing in the garden.  But there is a method of choosing plants by plan and by category so that the visit to the nursery can be more useful.  By understanding how to use categories of trees, shrubs, decoratives, perennials, and fillers, a good design plan is more assured.  Also, by designing on-site in the nursery, with help from staff, gardeners prone to impulse buying can avoid taking home a plant that doesn't fit their gardening scheme.

 

Doug Rice is a landscape architect who has taught garden design in the Seattle Community College system for over 20 years. Doug studied under the renowned Rich Haag LA who studied under Jay Appleton, the inventor of environmental psychology related to the landscape. Doug has taught and applied these principles for nearly 30 years, with great success. He has also studied and taught "Form School" Feng Shui in past years.

 

 

7-D --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Nicole Martini, JIm Kropf, "Panel: "Intentional Inclusiveness - Enriching the MG Experience through Increased Awareness of, and Sensitivity to, Diversity (Part 1)"

Why is diversity something we value within the MG Program and WSU? How can we work together to create a more inclusive and welcoming environment for all demographics within our counties? This session will explore how and why some MG Programs are choosing to embrace the realization that we can do better. We can do more to move forward with intention to create an environment that fosters a demographic within our membership and the audiences we serve that represents our widely varying county populations. You’ll also learn the reasons why the MG Program asks you to record the race of the clientele you serve.

 

Nicole Martini began with WSU Extension as the Pierce County Master Gardener Program Coordinator. She now works with 3,700 volunteers and 35 faculty and staff to teach homeowners science-based, sustainable gardening practices that protect Washington’s natural resources. She was on the national eXtension Social Media Training Committee, is a co-lead for the WSU Extension Gardening Website and is leading the development of online trainings on tree stewardship funded by WA Department of Natural Resources.

 

Jim Kropf is currently the Natural Resources Program Director for WSU Extension.  He is also the Director of County Administration for the 40 extension offices statewide.  He has been a faculty member for WSU Extension for 37 years.  He was the Area Agronomist in Chelan and Douglas Counties for 14 years followed by four years as the Area Horticulturalist for Pierce and King Counties. In addition to providing technical production skills for farmers, he focused on direct marketing, training new farmers, and on-farm research related to horticultural crops. Jim was raised on a small diversified farm in western Washington with a focus on small fruits.  He has a B.S. and M.S. in Agronomy from Washington State University.

 

SESSION 8 - Saturday, September 23, 2017 - 10:30 - 12:00

 

8-A --- GENERAL GARDENING  ---  Jeff Kozma, "Attracting Hummingbirds to Your Garden"

Hummingbirds are amazing little acrobatic fliers and a joy to watch. During this class Jeff Kozma, wildlife biologist and expert birder, will show you how to identify and attract the four species of hummingbirds regularly found in Washington State to your garden.

 

Jeff Kozma works as a Wildlife Biologist within the Department of Fisheries Resources Management of the Yakama Nation.  His education in wildlife biology and ecology includes a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Forest Biology from the State University of NY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, and a Master’s Degree in Wildlife Science from Texas Tech University.  His main interests focus on the life history and reproductive biology of birds and how habitat characteristics influence nest survival.  He has studied birds in a variety of different habitats including the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico, sagebrush/shrub-steppe in eastern WA, and currently in managed ponderosa pine forests of the eastern Cascades where he has been investigating the reproductive biology of the White-headed Woodpecker and other cavity-nesting birds for the last 14 years.  In his off time, he enjoys landscaping his yard for wildlife, with a special interest in providing habitat for hummingbirds.

 

 

8-B --- FOOD  ---  Phyllis Pugnetti: “Extending the Harvest”

There are many vegetables that will survive well into the winter.  Explore techniques to extend the growing season with cold frames and low tunnels.  Phyllis will discuss how to  select varieties that survive in low light and cold weather, sequential planting, and other helpful growing techniques.  Understanding what to plant, and when, will assure a year-round vegetable harvest.

 

Phyllis grew up in Pasco and Kennewick, moving to Issaquah, and finally settled in Yakima 13 years ago.  Her love affair with gardening started as a toddler playing in her grandma’s garden.  She had two very different gardening examples—her grandma who always gardened organically even when it was considered to be old fashioned, and her mom who believed that chemicals in the garden were the wave of the future.   By the 1970s organic gardening was once again ‘cool’ so Phyllis followed in her grandma’s footsteps.  Her interest is in organic gardening techniques; growing unusual and endangered vegetables; growing vegetables year round, saving open pollinated seed; and increasing pollinator habitat. She has been a MG since 2007.  She is the co-chair of MGs Heirloom Garden and Seed Library, editor for the last 6 years of the MG News (the monthly newsletter), and WA State MG of the Year in 2015.

 

8-C --- ENVIRONMENT  ---  Ryan Anderson: “Firewise Landscaping”

The years 2014 and 2015 were back to back state records for wildfire acreage and costs in Washington State.  The economy, ecology, and communities of Washington were affected in serious ways.   After 100 years of successful fire suppression, increased heat and drought from climate change, and a steady increase of people moving to the “Wildland Urban Interface”, we now know that the wrong fire on the wrong day can have devastating impacts if we are not prepared.

 

The Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network has been working with communities, agencies, and organizations throughout the state of Washington to help communities understand their wildfire risk and to take action to reduce that risk.  Communities increase their resilience to wildfire by knowing which actions to take before, during, and after wildfires. 

 

This presentation will discuss the background for wildfire in Washington State, provide an overview of what a fire adapted community is and does, discuss how the learning network is a tool for increased resilience and then focus in specifically on Firewise landscape principals related to the home ignition zone.

 

Ryan grew up in northern Idaho, graduating from Post Falls High School in 1992.  In 1996, he completed a BS in Biology from Gonzaga University with support from a Cross Country and Track scholarship.  Ryan later completed a MS in Environmental Science from Washington State University and received a professional certificate in Watershed Management from Portland State University.  He also completed a 6 day course at the National Fire Academy titled: Wildland Urban Interface: Fire Adapted Communities.

 

He moved to Yakima in 1997, where he has been working on watershed restoration and collaborative efforts for increasing sustainability ever since.   He worked with the Washington Department of Ecology’s Water Quality program and the City of Yakima until 2014, then he became the Executive Director of the Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council (RC&D).

 

In 2014, the RC&D was given the task of building a learning network to increase community resilience related to wildfire.  The Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network is in its 3rd year of operation and growth.  Also at the RC&D, Ryan oversees projects related to salmon recovery, sustainable water quality improvements, and fiscal sponsorship of locally based conservation groups.

 

In his free time Ryan likes to have time with his family at their sporting events or play outdoors hiking, biking, fishing, canoeing or camping.

 

8-D --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Nicole Martini: "Intentional Inclusiveness - Enriching the MG Experience through Increased Awareness of, and Sensitivity to, Diversity (Part 2)"

Have you noticed the changing demographics in Washington? Do you feel challenged/hesitant to reach out to minorities and immigrant communities?  How can we create a more inclusive MG Program and the programming we do? What are some ways to become more aware of, and sensitive to, cultural differences? In this session José García-Pabón, Associate Professor and Latino Community Studies specialist will help you build the tools and skills you need when reaching out to, and working with, Latino and a diversity of audiences. You’ll learn things may have never considered in your efforts to create a more welcoming and relevant MG program and attract participants and potential MG candidates.  Let’s learn how we can move forward with intention and awareness to increase the inclusiveness of MG and offer the richness of the MG experience encouraging people of varying backgrounds, lifestyles and demographics to be a part of our MG family.

 

Nicole Martini began with WSU Extension as the Pierce County Master Gardener Program Coordinator. She now works with 3,700 volunteers and 35 faculty and staff to teach homeowners science-based, sustainable gardening practices that protect Washington’s natural resources. She was on the national eXtension Social Media Training Committee, is a co-lead for the WSU Extension Gardening Website and is leading the development of online trainings on tree stewardship funded by WA Department of Natural Resources.

 

 

 

 

 

WSU Master Gardener Advanced-Education Conference - 2017 - hosted by the Master Gardener Foundation of Yakima County

Questions?  - -  mgyakima@earthlink.net

PO Box 10081, Yakima WA 98909

 

WSU Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, sex, religion, age, color, creed, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, and veteran status.  Evidence or noncompliance may be reported through your local WSU Extension office.  Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities and special needs who contact Nicole Martini, State Coordinator, at least two weeks prior to the event.

 

LEARNING LEARNING
First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.

3-D --- MASTER GARDENER SKILLS  ---  Nicole Martini: “Program / Foundation Relationship”

LEARNING LEARNING
First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.
LEARNING LEARNING
First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.

2-D --- --- Robin Hawley & Renee Holwegner: “Botanical Print Making – Part One”

LEARNING LEARNING
First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.
LEARNING LEARNING
First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.

First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.
LEARNING LEARNING
Menu
First and foremost, this conference is about LEARNING. From the 32 break-out class sessions to the featured Luncheon speaker to the Friday Evening Banquet Keynote speaker to the Sharing Success displays on Thursday evening, there will be many many opportunities to add to your knowledge and skills as a Master Gardener.
LEARNING LEARNING